Employment Equity Annual Report 2015–16

CNSC Employment Equity Annual Report 2015–16 (PDF, 303 KB)

© Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) 2016

PWGSC catalgue number CC171-2E-PDF

ISSN 1704-104X

Extracts from this document may be reproduced for individual use without permission provided the source is fully acknowledged. However, reproduction in whole or in part for purposes of resale or redistribution requires prior written permission from the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

Également publié en français sous le titre : Rapport annuel sur l’équité en matière d’emploi 2015–2016

Document availability

This document can be viewed on the CNSC website at nuclearsafety.gc.ca. To request a copy of the document in English or French, please contact:

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Publishing history

Spetember 2016     Version 1.0

Table of Contents

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission: General overview

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment; to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy; and to disseminate objective scientific, technical and regulatory information to the public.

The CNSC was established in 2000 under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), which sets out its mandate, responsibilities and powers. Through the NSCA and its associated regulations, the CNSC oversees:

  • nuclear power plants
  • uranium mines and mills
  • uranium processing and fuel fabrication facilities
  • nuclear research/testing facilities and non-power reactors
  • nuclear substance processing facilities
  • radioactive waste and waste management facilities
  • hospitals and cancer treatment centres
  • decommissioning of heavy water production plants
  • use of nuclear substances and radiation devices
  • packaging and transport of nuclear substances
  • import and export of nuclear substances and equipment

The CNSC also administers the Nuclear Liability Act and, as a responsible authority under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, carries out environmental assessments for nuclear projects in accordance with that legislation.

Organizational structure

The CNSC is an independent, quasi-judicial administrative tribunal and federal regulatory agency. As a departmental corporation under schedule II of the Financial Administration Act, it reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources. The CNSC is led by a president, employs more than 800 Canadians, and maintains 11 offices across Canada. These include two headquarters located in Ottawa, Ontario, as well as four regional offices in Laval, Quebec; Mississauga, Ontario; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; and Calgary, Alberta. There are also offices at each of the four Canadian nuclear power plants – Point Lepreau in New Brunswick, and Darlington, Pickering, and Bruce A and B in Ontario – and at Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario.

The CNSC’s approach to employment equity

Supporting a diverse workforce

Employment equity (EE) – the practices that create and support a representative and diverse workforce as well as a healthy work environment – is an integral component of the CNSC’s human resources management policies, programs and decision-making processes.

CNSC management considers Canada’s Employment Equity Act (EEA) an important contributor to the CNSC’s success in:

  • attracting and retaining top talent to drive productivity
  • regulating the Canadian nuclear industry
  • implementing Canada’s international commitments for the peaceful use of nuclear energy
  • providing the capacity to consult with Aboriginal communities
  • engaging all Canadians on nuclear-related regulatory matters.

In addition, the CNSC’s core values – respect, integrity, service, excellence, responsibility and safety – all support a diverse workforce and the evolution of an effective organizational culture, which in turn strengthen its ability to achieve its mandate.

Employment Equity Plan for 2013–14 to 2017–18

At the CNSC, EE is about creating a positive and inclusive work environment. With this goal in mind, CNSC policies and practices have been designed to eliminate any barriers related to its employment procedures. The CNSC is also dedicated to ensuring representation from members of employment equity designated groups (EEDGs) – women, members of visible minorities, people with disabilities and Aboriginal peoples – throughout its workforce.

To help achieve its EE goals, the CNSC updated its Employment Equity Plan in 2013–14 to cover the period of April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2018. More information on the plan’s key objectives and strategies is provided in the “Future strategies” section of this report. The following sections detail key activities undertaken in 2015–16.Footnote 1

Employment Equity Accountability Framework

Established in 2013–14, the CNSC’s Employment Equity Accountability Framework outlines the legal requirements, expected results and performance indicators used to assess progress and success in implementing the Employment Equity Plan. The framework clearly sets out the ways in which senior management and employees are accountable for EE:

  • All employees are responsible for helping to advance the CNSC’s goals in this area by learning about and contributing to EE in the workplace, and by raising issues or concerns that may be (or be perceived to be) barriers to EE.
  • Managers at all levels are accountable for contributing to the implementation of the Employment Equity Plan. This includes ensuring that EE is implemented within their areas of responsibility by providing a supportive work environment that will attract and retain members of EEDGs.

Internal safety culture

Our approach to regulating for safety represents the common denominator in how we manage ourselves as individuals and as an organization. Safety is one of our core values and as such is always emphasized over competing goals in our day-to-day decision making.

The CNSC’s internal safety culture is characterized by three pillars:

  • health, safety and wellness programs
  • a collaborative workplace and continuous improvement
  • learning and knowledge management

These three pillars strongly support the promotion and implementation of the activities and initiatives described in the Employment Equity Plan. Since 2014, the Executive Vice President and Chief Regulatory Operations Officer has conducted five open forums on the internal safety culture. The CNSC continues to identify and address any issue relating to these three pillars through lunch-and-learn conferences, articles in Synergy and employee “pulse” surveys.

New Key behaviours at the CNSC

To strengthen the CNSC’s internal safety culture, in October 2015, the Management Committee approved a proposal to define and apply department-wide key behavioural competencies. In 2015–16, the Human Resources Directorate conducted focus groups with 150 employees from all levels and all branches to define and identify the key behaviours.

These behaviours will help define expectations and ensure their alignment throughout our collaboration to create the workplace that the CNSC needs, both today and tomorrow. They will inspire employees to demonstrate respect, integrity, excellence and cooperation, and show them the benefits of investing in their personal growth and leadership. They will be integrated in the staffing process, the employee performance management program and the recognition program. The CNSC’s key behaviours will support the implementation and development of equity and diversity activities and initiatives.

New Diversity Forum

To foster an inclusive environment that celebrates diversity, the Management Committee authorised the Human Resources Directorate to proceed with the proposed plans for the establishment of a CNSC Diversity Forum in 2015–16. As part of a one-year pilot project, the CNSC hired a consultant to design and deliver two sessions on diversity, to which all employees had been invited.

Topics covered a range of diversity issues, including those relating to the four EEDGs. Staff were invited to suggest topics, which were posted on BORIS, the CNSC’s intranet site, prior to each forum.

The first forum focused on building awareness of diversity and inclusiveness, and generating opportunities for individual and group reflection using an “edutainment” approach. A panel of three employee speakers shared their experiences in an interactive and engaging session.

The second forum built on the themes that were explored during the first forum and further familiarized participants with tools for interpersonal effectiveness in a diverse work environment. Some of the topics covered were opinion bias, accepting differences, the brain’s operating systems, prejudice and discrimination.

Both forums were interactive, and participants really enjoyed the experience. The turnout was excellent for both forums: 60 employees participated.

Collaborative Workplace Initiative

A collaborative workplace is an environment where civility and the CNSC values underpin all employee interactions, where management values and listens to those who work for them, where excellence is strongly encouraged, and where well-being in all its forms is actively promoted.

The Collaborative Workplace Initiative was launched in January 2013 to address issues of perceived harassment, inappropriate behaviour and incivility in the workplace, and to respond to concerns raised by some employees around fear of reprisal or negative consequences. Resulting from close cooperation with colleagues from NUREG, it was designed to create an engaging and positive work environment for all employees.

This initiative resulted in several actions and tools:

  • Compulsory training on a shared language of civility was given in 2013–14 and 2014–15 to the majority of employees and managers.
  • A brochure was distributed to all employees outlining the many services available to help resolve workplace issues or concerns. A brochure on recourse was distributed to all employees.
  • Problem-solving tools were provided to employees and managers.
  • The essentials of this training on civility and expected workplace behaviour have since been integrated into the two-day orientation session for new employees.

Workplace Accommodation Policy

In accordance with the CNSC’s Workplace Accommodation Policy, and in line with the CNSC’s corporate value of respect for others and its commitment to human dignity, accommodation is provided to all staff and external candidates seeking employment at the CNSC.

While accommodation is often associated with removing barriers related to a physical disability, other needs may also arise from factors such as race, nationality, ethnicity, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, mental disability or pardoned conviction. These needs are addressed at both the general and individual levels to ensure all staff members can use their skills and experience effectively and efficiently.

The CNSC analyzed the accommodations required over the last two years and reviewed its Workplace Accommodation Policy in 2015–16, even though the Treasury Board Secretariat’s revised policy on the duty to accommodate was still pending. A kit for managers, which includes a ‟quick tips” document, was developed to help them gain a better understanding of their responsibilities for workplace accommodation.

New In addition, in 2015–16, the CNSC developed a strategy to promote workplace mental health. This strategy will focus on mental wellness and foster a culture of acceptance and support for those struggling with mental health issues. Several events arising from the “Not Myself Today” campaign are planned for 2016–17.

Web accessibility

Web accessibility is now a legislated requirement for the Government of Canada. It ensures Canadians with disabilities (whether motor, auditory, cognitive, seizure/neurological or visual) can access and use content on the Web. Accessible content provides the opportunity for all citizens to participate in and contribute to the CNSC’s consultative and regulatory processes.

Over the last few years, the CNSC has assessed and adjusted thousands of pages on its public website to ensure accessibility for people with disabilities and to comply with the internationally accepted Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

Web-accessible templates and job aids were also developed, with training sessions on Web accessibility provided for many employees across the organization who generate content on the CNSC’s website.

Learning and development

The CNSC invests considerably in learning and development, with all employees encouraged to pursue personal and professional development initiatives at all stages of their careers.

The CNSC management training program includes EE training and explains the requirements of the Employment Equity Act, including the duty to accommodate, the role of managers in implementing the Act and the status of the CNSC’s Employment Equity Plan. The training program also provides information on managing in a harassment-free workplace. Although aimed at all managers, employees interested in management positions are welcome to attend the training.

An orientation program is offered to all new CNSC employees. Information on EE, the Informal Conflict Management System, the Employee Assistance Program and CNSC policies is communicated through the orientation manual and the orientation sessions to ensure all employees are aware of the services and tools available to them in creating a positive working environment.

The CNSC offers its employees various types of training, such as second-language training, professional development training, skills maintenance training for managers, and compulsory training. CNSC staff also have the opportunity to attend language workshops and testing-preparation sessions. In 2015–16, 117 employees participated in part-time, in-house language training, 85 employees attended workshops and preparation sessions, and 14 managers participated in the skills-maintenance program.

Recruitment and Staffing Policy

The regulation of nuclear energy and materials requires employees with a high level of technical competency. Attracting and retaining such specialized expertise is a strategic priority for the CNSC. Recognizing the value of building a highly skilled and diverse workforce that reflects the composition of Canada’s population, the CNSC encourages members of EEDGs to apply for open positions. The CNSC Staffing Policy Framework promotes a values-based approach to staffing, based on competency, fairness, transparency and access. These values are key to ensuring fair and equal access to employment opportunities for all, including members of EEDGs.

The organization continues to work toward the goals established in its five-year Employment Equity Plan (2013–18). As intended in its EE Plan, the CNSC has implemented a new applicant tracking system, allowing external and internal applicants to create a profile, including self-identifying while applying for job opportunities. With this information, the Human Resources Directorate will be able to identify if any barriers exist at certain stages of the hiring process and to address them by providing information and training to managers.

The Human Resources Dashboard shows EE statistics by directorate and serves to inform management on EE representation within the CNSC and opportunities for improvement.

Self-identification

By inviting new employees to complete self-identification questionnaires for EE purposes, the CNSC is able to gain an accurate picture of the composition of its workforce and the extent to which its employees represent the Canadian population. In 2015–16, the response rate for the self-identification questionnaires was 96%, slightly higher than the 95% response rate in 2014–15.

Consultation

Union representatives (NUREG) and management meet regularly to discuss issues pertaining to EE through the Labour Management Consultation Committee’s monthly informal meetings and ad hoc meetings. Results from the Employment Equity Annual Report are shared with NUREG representatives, who were also consulted in the development of both the Employment Equity Plan 2013–14 to 2017–18 and the CNSC Diversity Forum.

Further, to maintain a collaborative workplace where managers listen to those who work for them and recognize the value of their contribution, employee consultation is actively encouraged and takes various forms, such as division and directorate meetings, discussion forums, workshops, lunch-and-learn sessions, and articles in Synergy to which employees can submit questions and/or comments.

Results of the 2014 Public Service Employee Survey (PSES) were shared with employees and management to develop action plans addressing opportunities for improvement. The CNSC continues to closely monitor the action plans developed by each directorate.

Results of the 2014 PSES questions on harassment and discrimination show a significant improvement compared to 2014, 2011 and 2008 for the CNSC, thereby demonstrating that the Collaborative Workplace Initiative launched in January 2013, including civility awareness training provided to employees, have had a positive impact.

In addition to the PSES analysis, the CNSC developed focused online polls to gain a better understanding of the organization’s strengths and opportunities for improvement. In 2015–16, a poll on learning was conducted. As with the PSES, results are shared with all CNSC staff within a short time of the poll closing. When issues are identified in the results, the Human Resources Directorate works with senior management to communicate the results and propose next steps to address areas of concern. Results have improved: 46% of employees took part in this poll, 93% of respondents felt that their personal learning plan activities had value (compared to 83% in 2013 and 82% in 2011), and 87% agreed that they enjoyed fair and equal access to training opportunities (compared to 77% in 2013 and 70% in 2011).

Workforce representation data

Representation of employment equity designated groups

Since 2014–15, the data used to calculate workforce availability (WFA) come from the 2011 Census of Canada and the 2011 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey. National WFA data were used to calculate the WFA for all employment equity occupational groups (EEOGs).

In 2015–16, the CNSC observed a decrease in representation in three of the four EEDGs when compared to 2014–15. The only EEDG that exceeded the WFA were members of visible minorities at 18.3%. With a workforce of 880 employees, the size of the CNSC is moderate. Consequently, it takes only a relatively small number of employee movements to affect workforce representation, resulting in more fluctuation than what might be experienced by a larger organization. This is particularly true in the EEDGs of Aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities.

The professionals group is the predominant EEOG at the CNSC, representing 69.5% of all employees. It is primarily in this group that the CNSC hires specialized employees in the nuclear field. As indicated in tables 4 to 7 (see appendix), Aboriginal peoples and members of visible minorities are fully represented in the professionals group, while women and persons with disabilities are under-represented (70.7% and 51.6% of the WFA, respectively).

For more detailed data on the representation of the six EEDGs by EEOG, see table 3 in the appendix.

For EE purposes, the employee population includes indeterminate employees and term employees with three months of service or more. The following pages highlight the representation of the four EEDGs at the CNSC as of March 31, 2016.

Table A: Comparison of CNSC employee representation with workforce availability (WFA), 2014–15 versus 2015–16
Employment equity designated group WFA 2011 Census Data 2014-15 2015-16
CNSC Representation as a percentage of WFA CSNC Representation as a percentage of WFA*
Women 48.2% 47.2% 98.0% 45.9% 95.0%
Aboriginal peoples 3.5% 2.5% 71.4% 2.4% 68.2%
Persons with disabilities 4.9% 3.1% 63.3% 2.5% 51.0%
Members of visible minorities 17.8% 17.8% 100.2% 18.3% 102.8%
* 2015–16 representation calculated using the WFA based on the 2011 Census data.

More specifically, in 2015–16:

  • the representation of women decreased from 98% to 95% of the WFA
  • the representation of Aboriginal peoples decreased to 68.2% of the WFA
  • the representation of persons with disabilities decreased to 51.0% of the WFA
  • the representation of members of visible minorities increased slightly compared to 2014–15 and is higher than the WFA.

See table 1 in the appendix for detailed data on the representation of the four EEDGs at the CNSC, and table 2 for their distribution by regions and provinces.

Representation of employment equity occupational groups

CNSC employees are represented in 6 of the 14 EEOGs:

  • senior managers
  • middle and other managers
  • professionals
  • semi-professionals and technicians
  • administrative and senior clerical personnel
  • clerical personnel.

Representation of employment equity occupational groups

Hiring

The overall rate of hiring of women (40.4%) is lower than the WFA of 48.2%. This was caused primarily by a rate of hiring below the WFA in five EEOGs: senior managers, middle and other managers, professionals, administrative and senior clerical personnel, and clerical personnel. The hiring rate exceeded the WFA (100.0% vs. 52.0%) only for the professionals EEOG.

The rate of hiring of members of visible minorities exceeded the WFA in three EEOGs: professionals (21.7% versus 19.9%), semi-professionals and technicians (50.0% versus 16.3%), and administrative and senior clerical personnel (20.8% versus 14.1%). No Aboriginal peoples and no persons with disabilities self-identified during 2015–16.

For more detailed data on hiring rates, see table 8 in the appendix.

Promotions

A total of 20 CNSC employees were promoted in 2015–16, up from 16 in 2014–15. Promotions occurred in two of the four EEDGs (women and members of visible minorities).

Twelve women were promoted in 2015–16, compared to 11 in 2014–15 and five in 201314. As for members of visible minorities, four (20% versus a WFA of 17.8%) were promoted in 2015–16, compared to two (12.5% versus a WFA of 17.8%) in 2014–15.

For more detailed data on promotions, see table 9 in the appendix.

Departures

A total of 111 employees left the organization in 2015–16, up from the 102 departures reported in 2014–15. The rate of departure for two of the four EEDGs was higher than their respective WFA: 50.0% versus 48.2% in the case of women and 6.3% versus 4.9% in the case of persons with disabilities.

Looking specifically at women, most of the departures occurred in the following EEOGs: professionals (20) and administrative and senior clerical personnel (31).

For Aboriginals peoples, the departure rate was lower than the WFA (1.8% versus 3.5%). The departure rate for members of visible minorities was slightly lower than the WFA (17.1% versus 17.8%). Most of the departures recorded in this EEDG were professionals (12) and administrative and senior clerical personnel (5). Because these groups are small, a relatively low number of employee movements can have a significant impact on workforce representation.

For more detailed data on departures, see table 10 in the appendix.

Salary range

Across the CNSC, roughly 59.0% of employees earn $95,000 or more annually. As was the case in the previous fiscal year, proportionately more members of visible minorities earn above this salary, while the salaries of Aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities are close to the CNSC average. In contrast, the proportion of women earning more than $95,000 is lower (17.0%) than the CNSC average, largely due to their higher representation in the administrative and senior clerical personnel EEOG and the clerical personnel EEOG, where salaries are lower.

For more detailed data on salary range, see table 11 in the appendix.

Future strategies

In 2013–14, the CNSC developed a five-year Employment Equity Plan, outlining specific strategies to assist in pursuing its efforts to improve its performance.

In 2015–16, the CNSC made significant progress against planned activities, highlights of which include:

  • creating a highly successful Diversity Forum
  • developing a means of tracking utilization of self-declaration data in staffing processes, using a new applicant tracking system
  • developing a workplace mental health promotion strategy
  • developing a kit for managers to help them gain a better understanding of their responsibilities in terms of accommodation
  • monitoring and analyzing departures and exit interviews.

Moving forward, the CNSC will continue to act to improve EE representation by identifying and implementing new initiatives to achieve the desired objectives. In 2016–17, key initiatives will include:

  • sharing the Workplace Accommodation Policy with all employees and providing managers with training
  • continuing to rely on the Diversity Forum to engage staff in developing and completing initiatives focused on diversity and equity
  • developing an awareness-raising strategy to encourage employees to self-identify if their status changed at the start of 2017
  • implementing the initiatives developed in the context of the “Not Myself Today” mental health campaign
  • analyzing data on self-identification staffing processes
  • updating the analysis of the workforce by occupational group and the gap analysis of representation by directorate, and sharing the results with management through quarterly meetings
  • continuing to monitor departures and exit interviews'
  • increasing awareness of the purpose, directives and related practices of EE.

Conclusion

At the CNSC, EE means creating a positive and inclusive workplace. In 2013–14, the CNSC had achieved full representation in three of the four EEDGs (women: 121.2%, Aboriginal peoples: 143.6%, and members of visible minorities: 107.5%). Since 2014–15, the CNSC noted a lower representation rate in three of the four EEDGs compared to 2015-2016: women (98% versus 95%), Aboriginal peoples (71.4% versus 68.2%) and persons with disabilities (63.3% versus 51%). The CNSC has experienced an increasing rate of departures in the last few years, particularly due to employee retirements as a result of the average age of its workforce and the departures of term employees: 111 departures in 2015–16, compared to 102 in 2014–15 and 94 in 2013–14. Looking ahead, the CNSC will continue to implement the actions outlined in its five-year Employment Equity Plan, work with other departments, and explore best practices and measures that can be put in place to increase representation to better reflect the Canadian population.

Appendix: Workforce representation data tables as of March 31, 2016

Program 1.1 Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Representation of employment equity designated groups

Table 1: Representation and workforce availability of EEDGs
Employment equity designated group March 31, 2016 CNSC Representation Workforce availability (WFA)* CNSC Representation (as a percentage of WFA)
# % % %
Women 404 45.9 48.2 95.0
Aboriginal peoples 21 2.4 3.5 68.2
Persons with disabilities 22 2.5 4.9 51.0
Members of visible minorities 161 18.3 17.8 102.8
* Source: 2011 Census of Canada and 2011 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey at the National Occupational Classification level.
http://www.nuclearsafety.gc.ca:55554/eng/the-commission/meetings/cmd/index.cfm
Table 3: Representation of EEDGs by EEOG
Employment equity occupational group March 31, 2016 Total employees Representation
Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
# # % # % # % # %
Senior managers 23 2.6 7 30.4 0 0.0 0.0 * 13.0
Middle and other managers 54 6.1 18 33.3 * 1.9 5.6 7 13.0
Professionals 612 69.5 238 38.9 13 2.1 2.0 133 21.7
Semi-professionals and technicians 32 3.6 11 34.4 * 9.4 3.1 7 21.9
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 116 13.2 97 83.6 * 2.6 4.3 10 8.6
Clerical personnel 43 4.9 33 76.7 * 2.3 2.3 * 2.3
Total 880 100 45.9 45.9 21 2.4 2.5 161 18.3
* Data are suppressed to protect confidentiality of information and/or when the representation number was three or less.
Table 4: Representation of women by EEOG and workforce availability
Employment equity designated group March 31, 2016 Total employees CNSC Representation (women) Workforce availability (WFA)* CNSC Representation (as a percentage of WFA)
# # % % %
Senior managers 23 7 30.4 27.4 111.1
Middle and other managers 54 18 33.3 38.9 85.7
Professionals 612 238 38.9 55 70.7
Semi-professionals and technicians 32 11 34.4 52 66.1
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 116 97 83.6 82.6 101.2
Clerical personnel 43 33 76.7 68.4 112.2
Total 880 404 45.9 48.2 95
* Source: 2011 Census of Canada and 2011 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey at the National Occupational Classification level.
Table 5: Representation of Aboriginal peoples by EEOG and workforce availability
Employment equity designated group March 31, 2016 Total employees CNSC Representation (Aboriginal peoples) Workforce availability (WFA)** Representation (as a percentage of WFA)
# # % % %
Senior managers 23 0 0.0 2.9 0.0
Middle and other managers 54 * 1.9 2.2 86.3
Professionals 612 13 2.1 2.1 100.0
Semi-professionals and technicians 32 * 9.4 3.7 253.4
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 116 * 2.6 3.0 86.7
Clerical personnel 43 * 2.3 3.4 68.4
Total 880 21 2.4 3.5 68.2
* Data are suppressed to protect confidentiality of information and/or when the representation number was three or less.
** Source: 2011 Census of Canada and 2011 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey at the National Occupational Classification level.
Table 6: Representation of persons with disabilities by EEOG and workforce availability
Employment equity occupational group March 31, 2016 Total employees CNSC representation
(persons with disabilities)
Workforce availability (WFA)** Representation (as a percentage of WFA)
# # % % %
Senior managers 23 0 0.0 4.3 0.0
Middle and other managers 54 * 5.6 4.3 129.2
Professionals 612 12 2.0 3.8 51.6
Semi-professionals and technicians 32 * 3.1 4.6 67.9
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 116 5 4.3 3.4 126.8
Clerical personnel 43 * 2.3 7.0 32.9
Total 880 22 2.5 4.9 51.0
* Data are suppressed to protect confidentiality of information and/or when the representation number was three or less.
** Source: 2011 Census of Canada and 2011 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey at the National Occupational Classification level.
Table 7: Representation of members of visible minorities by EEOG and workforce availability
Employment equity occupational group March 31, 2016 Total employees CNSC representation
(members of visible minorities)
Workforce availability (WFA)** Representation (as a percentage of WFA)
# # % % %
Senior managers 23 * 13.0 10.1 129.1
Middle and other managers 54 7 13.0 15.0 86.6
Professionals 612 133 21.7 19.9 109.2
Semi-professionals and technicians 32 7 21.9 16.3 134.2
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 116 10 8.6 14.1 61.1
Clerical personnel 43 * 2.3 19.0 12.2
Total 880 161 18.3 17.8 102.8
* Data are suppressed to protect confidentiality of information and/or when the representation number was three or less.
** Source: 2011 Census of Canada and 2011 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey at the National Occupational Classification level.

Representation in hiring, promotions, departures and salary range

Table 8: Hiring of EEDGs by EEOG
Employment equity occupational group March 31, 2016 Total employees Hiring
Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
# # % # % # % # %
Senior managers * 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Middle and other managers * 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Professionals 83 32 38.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 18 21.7
Semi-professionals and technicians * * 100.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 * 50.0
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 24 12 50.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 5 20.8
Clerical personnel * 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Total 114 46 40.4 0 0.0 0 0.0 24 21.1
* Data are suppressed to protect confidentiality of information and/or when the representation number was three or less.
Table 9: Promotions of EEDG by EEOG
Employment equity occupational group March 31, 2016 Total employees Hiring
Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
# # % # % # % # %
Senior managers * 0 100.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Middle and other managers 4 * 50.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 * 25.0
Professionals 12 8 66.7 0 0.0 0 0.0 * 25.0
Semi-professionals and technicians 0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Administrative and senior clerical personnel * * 100.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Clerical personnel 0 2 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Total 20 12 60.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 4 20.0
* Data are suppressed to protect confidentiality of information and/or when the representation number was three or less.
Table 10: Departures of EEDG by EEOG
Employment equity occupational group March 31, 2016 Total employees Departures
Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
# # % # % # % # %
Senior managers 0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Middle and other managers 5 * 20.0 * 20.0 0 0.0 * 20.0
Professionals 52 20 38.5 * 1.9 * 3.8 12 23.1
Semi-professionals and technicians 4 * 25.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 43 31 72.1 0 0.0 * 7.0 5 11.6
Clerical personnel 7 * 42.9 0 0.0 * 28.6 * 14.3
Total 111 56 50.5 * 1.8 7 6.3 19 17.1
* Data are suppressed to protect confidentiality of information and/or when the representation number was three or less.
Table 11: Representation of EEDGs by salary range
Salary range ($)
March 31, 2016
Total employees
Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
# CUM% # % CUM% # % CUM% # % CUM% # % CUM%
39,999 or less 20 2.3% 8 0.00% 2.0% 0 0.0% 0.0% 0 0.0% 0.0% 2 0.0% 1.2%
40,000 to 44,999 8 3.20% 4 50.0% 3.0% 0 0.0% 0.0% 0 0.0% 0.0% 2 25.0% 2.5%
45,000 to 49,999 7 4.00% 6 85.70% 4.50% 1 14.30% 4.80% 1 14.3% 4.5% 1 14.35% 3.1%
50,000 to 54,999 7 4.80% 7 100.0% 6.20% 0 0.0% 4.80% 0 0.0% 4.5% 2 28.6% 4.3%
55,000 to 59,999 145 21.30% 97 66.90% 30.20% 4 2.80% 23.80% 4 2.8% 22.7% 19 13.1% 16.1%
60,000 to 64,999 25 24.10% 17 68.0% 34.40% 1 4.00% 28.60% 2 8.0% 31.8% 5 20.0% 19.3%
65,000 to 69,999 41 28.80% 32 78.00% 42.30% 2 4.90% 38.10% 0 0.0% 31.8% 1 2.4% 19.9%
70,000 to 74,999 16 30.60% 9 56.30% 44.60% 0 0.0% 38.10% 0 0.0% 31.8% 3 18.8% 21.7%
75,000 to 79,999 7 31.40% 3 42.90% 45.30% 1 14.30% 42.90% 0 0.0% 31.8% 1 14.3% 22.4%
80,000 to 84,999 58 38.0% 35 60.30% 54.00% 0 0.0% 42.90% 0 0.0% 31.8% 9 15.5% 28.0%
85,000 to 89,999 23 40.60% 13 56.50% 57.20% 1 4.30% 47.60% 0 0.0% 31.8% 7 30.4% 32.3%
90,000 to 94,999 4 41.00% 3 75.0% 57.90% 0 0.0% 47.60% 0 0.0% 31.8% 0 0.0% 32.3%
95,000 to 99,999 152 58.30% 61 40.10% 73.00% 4 2.60% 66.70% 6 3.9% 59.1% 32 21.1% 52.2%
100,000 to 104,999 16 60.10% 9 56.30% 75.20% 0 0.0% 66.70% 0 0.0% 59.1% 5 31.3% 55.3%
105,000 to 109,999 7 60.90% 2 28.60% 75.70% 0 0.0% 66.70% 0 0.0% 59.1% 1 14.3% 55.9%
110,000 to 114,999 2 61.10% 2 100.0% 76.20% 0 0.0% 66.70% 0 0.0% 59.1% 0 0.0% 55.9%
115,000 to 119,999 168 80.20% 52 31.0% 89.10% 3 1.80% 81.0% 6 3.6% 86.4% 31 18.5% 75.25
120,000 or more 174 100.0% 44 25.30% 100.0% 4 2.30% 100.0% 3 1.7% 100.0% 40 23.0% 100.0%
Total 880 100.0% 404 45.9% 100.0% 21 2.4% 100.0% 22 2.5% 100.0% 161 18.3% 100.0%
* Percentage by salary range.
** Each figure in the CUM% column represents the cumulative total percentage of each EE designated group in the CNSC workforce (all employees, women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and persons in a visible minority group) in the identified salary range or lower.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Year ranges in this report refer to fiscal years, which begin on April 1 each year and end on March 31 the following year.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

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