REGDOC-3.6, Glossary of CNSC Terminology - Glossary - C


calandria (calandre)

With respect to CANDU nuclear power plants, a cylindrical tank that houses the reactor’s fuel channels as well as the moderator. See also calandria tube.

calandria tube (tube de calandre)

With respect to CANDU nuclear power plants, one of a set of tubes that span the calandria and separate the pressure tubes from the moderator. Each calandria tube contains one pressure tube, with an insulating gas between the calandria tube and the pressure tube. See also calandria.

calculational method (méthode de calcul)

The calculational procedures – mathematical equations, approximations, assumptions, associated numerical parameters (such as cross-sections) – that yield the calculated results.

calendar year (année civile)

A period of 12 consecutive months beginning on January 1.

calibration (étalonnage)

The process to verify that, with a known precision input, a model, instrument or channel parameter gives the required output.

Canada/IAEA Safeguards Agreement (Accord relatif aux garanties entre le Canada et l’AIEA)

See IAEA Agreement or safeguards agreement.

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) (Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire [CCSN])

Canada’s nuclear regulator, established under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act to regulate the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment; to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy; and to disseminate objective scientific, technical and regulatory information to the public.

Canadian Standards Association (CSA) (Association canadienne de normalisation [CSA])

See CSA Group.

CANDU reactor (réacteur CANDU)

A Canadian-invented pressurized heavy-water reactor that uses heavy water (deuterium oxide) for moderator and coolant and natural uranium for fuel. “CANDU” is short for CANada Deuterium Uranium. Also called CANDU.

carrier (transporteur)

Has the same meaning as in section 1.4 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations. (Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

CASA (ESAC)

criticality accident sequence assessment

catch-all controls (contrôles « fourre-tout »)

See end-use controls.

Category I nuclear material (matière nucléaire de catégorie I)

A nuclear substance listed in column 1 of Schedule 1 that is in the corresponding form set out in column 2 and the corresponding quantity set out in column 3 of Schedule 1. (Source: Nuclear Security Regulations)

Note: Use Roman numerals for this term. Also note that categories for nuclear material do not have the same meaning as categories for sources (compare to Category 1 source).

Category 1 source (source de catégorie 1)

A sealed source that, if not safely managed or securely protected, would be likely to cause permanent injury to a person who handled it, or was otherwise in contact with it, for more than a few minutes. It would probably be fatal to be close to this amount of unshielded radioactive material for a period of a few minutes to an hour. In Canada, these sources are typically used in practices such as self-shielded irradiators and radiation teletherapy. Note: Use Arabic numerals for this term. Also note that categories for sources do not have the same meaning as categories for nuclear material (compare to Category I nuclear material).

Category II nuclear material (matière nucléaire de catégorie II)

A nuclear substance listed in column 1 of Schedule 1 that is in the corresponding form set out in column 2 and the corresponding quantity set out in column 4 of Schedule 1. (Source: Nuclear Security Regulations)

Note: Use Roman numerals for this term. Also note that categories for nuclear material do not have the same meaning as categories for sources (compare to Category 2 source).

Category 2 source (source de catégorie 2)

A sealed source that, if not safely managed or securely protected, could cause permanent injury to a person who handled it, or was otherwise in contact with it, for a short time (minutes to hours). It could possibly be fatal to be close to this amount of unshielded radioactive material for a period of hours to days. In Canada, these sources are typically used in practices such as industrial gamma radiography and oil well logging. Note: Use Arabic numerals for this term. Also note that categories for sources do not have the same meaning as categories for nuclear material (compare to Category II nuclear material).

Category III nuclear material (matière nucléaire de catégorie III)

A nuclear substance listed in column 1 of Schedule 1 that is in the corresponding form set out in column 2 and the corresponding quantity set out in column 5 of Schedule 1. (Source: Nuclear Security Regulations)

Note: Use Roman numerals for this term. Also note that categories for nuclear material do not have the same meaning as categories for sources (compare to Category 3 source).

Category 3 source (source de catégorie 3)

A sealed source that, if not safely managed or securely protected, could cause permanent injury to a person who handled it, or was otherwise in contact with it, for some hours. It could possibly – although it is unlikely – be fatal to be close to this amount of unshielded radioactive material for a period of days to weeks. In Canada, these sources are typically used in practices such as fixed nuclear gauges and high dose rate brachytherapy. Note: Use Arabic numerals for this term. Also note that categories for sources do not have the same meaning as categories for nuclear material (compare to Category III nuclear material).

Category 4 source (source de catégorie 4)

A sealed source that is very unlikely to permanently injure anyone. However, this amount of unshielded radioactive material, if not safely managed or securely protected, could possibly – although it is unlikely – temporarily injure someone who handled it or was otherwise in contact with it, or who was close to it for a period of many weeks. In Canada, these sources are typically used in practices such as portable nuclear gauges. Note: Use Arabic numerals for this term. Also note that categories for sources do not have the same meaning as categories for nuclear material (compare to Category I nuclear material, Category II nuclear material and Category III nuclear material).

Category 5 source (source de catégorie 5)

A sealed source that could not permanently injure someone. In Canada, these sources are typically used in practices such as low dose rate brachytherapy or in gas chromatography instruments. Note: Use Arabic numerals for this term. Also note that categories for sources do not have the same meaning as categories for nuclear material (compare to Category I nuclear material, Category II nuclear material, and Category III nuclear material).

category change (changement de catégorie)

A change in one of the three categories of uranium: depleted uranium, natural uranium and enriched uranium. Category change results in the reduction of one category of uranium and a corresponding increase in another. Uranium can change category as a result of blending, enrichment, depletion or burnup. For example, natural uranium can become depleted uranium as a result of the burnup of uranium‑235.

CCF (DCC)

See common-cause failure.

CCME (CCME)

Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment

CEAA 2012 (LCEE 2012)

Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012

CEDO (OAEA)

See certified exposure device operator.

CEPA (LCPE)

Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

CEPA toxic (substance toxique au sens de la LCPE)

Has the meaning in section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

certificate (attestation; voir aussi homologation ou document d’homologation)

A document issued by the Commission or by a designated officer authorized under paragraph 37(2)(b) of the Act, indicating that a person is certified. (Source: Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations)

OR

A document issued by the Commission or by a designated officer authorized under paragraph 37(2)(a) of the Act, indicating that a model of Class II prescribed equipment is certified, or authorized under paragraph 37(2)(b) of the Act, indicating that a person is certified. (Source: Class II Nuclear Facilities and Prescribed Equipment Regulations)

OR

A document issued by the Commission or by a designated officer authorized under paragraph 37(2)(a) or (b) of the Act, indicating that prescribed equipment or a person is certified. (Source: Nuclear Substances and Radiation Devices Regulations)

OR

A document issued by the Commission under paragraph 21(1)(h) of the Act or by a designated officer authorized under paragraph 37(2)(a) of the Act, indicating the certification of:

  1. a package design;
  2. a design for special form radioactive material;
  3. a design for low dispersible radioactive material;
  4. the calculation of a value demonstrating that fissile-excepted radioactive material will remain subcritical;
  5. the calculation of the basic radionuclide value for radioactive material that has a basic radionuclide value that is not listed in the IAEA Regulations; or
  6. the calculation, for an instrument or article that has an alternative activity limit for an exempt consignment, of the alternative activity limit.

(Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

certification (accréditation)

A written attestation from the Commission, or from a designated officer authorized by it, that a person is qualified to carry out licensed activities (including the duties of a given position).

certified (homologué)

Certified by the Commission under paragraph 21(1)(i) of the Act or by a designated officer authorized under paragraph 37(2)(b) of the Act. (Source: Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations)

OR

Certified by the Commission under paragraph 21(1)(h) or (i) of the Act or by a designated officer authorized under paragraph 37(2)(a) or (b) of the Act. (Sources: Class II Nuclear Facilities and Prescribed Equipment Regulations; Nuclear Substances and Radiation Devices Regulations; Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

certified exposure device operator (CEDO) (opérateur d’appareil d’exposition accrédité)

A person who has the qualifications to safely operate industrial gamma radiography exposure devices anywhere in Canada and who is certified as such by the CNSC.

change (modification)

With respect to dosimetry information, any change to that information, such as a decrease or increase to an assigned dose value previously filed with the National Dose Registry. Normally, changes to dosimeter wearing periods are not included as a modification to dosimetry information.

CHF (densité de flux thermique critique)

critical heat flux

Ci (Ci)

curie; see becquerel

Class I nuclear facility (installation nucléaire de catégorie I)

A Class IA nuclear facility and a Class IB nuclear facility. (Source: Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations)

Class IA nuclear facility (installation nucléaire de catégorie IA)

Any of the following nuclear facilities:

  1. a nuclear fission or fusion reactor or subcritical nuclear assembly; and
  2. a vehicle that is equipped with a nuclear reactor.

(Source:Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations)

Class IB nuclear facility (installation nucléaire de catégorie IB)

Any of the following nuclear facilities:

  1. a facility that includes a particle accelerator, other than a particle accelerator described in paragraphs (d) and (e) of the definition “Class II prescribed equipment” in section 1 of the Class II Nuclear Facilities and Prescribed Equipment Regulations;
  2. a plant for the processing, reprocessing or separation of an isotope of uranium, thorium or plutonium;
  3. a plant for the manufacture of a product from uranium, thorium or plutonium;
  4. a plant, other than a Class II nuclear facility as defined in section 1 of the Class II Nuclear Facilities and Prescribed Equipment Regulations, for the processing or use, in a quantity greater than 1015 Bq per calendar year, of nuclear substances other than uranium, thorium or plutonium;
  5. a facility for the disposal of a nuclear substance generated at another nuclear facility; and
  6. a facility prescribed by paragraph 19(a) or (b) of the General Nuclear Safety and Control Regulations.

(Source: Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations)

Class II nuclear facility (installation nucléaire de catégorie II)

A facility that includes Class II prescribed equipment. (Source: Class II Nuclear Facilities and Prescribed Equipment Regulations)

Class II prescribed equipment (équipement réglementé de catégorie II)

[Any of the following:]

  1. an irradiator that uses more than 1015 Bq of a nuclear substance;
  2. an irradiator that requires shielding which is not part of the irradiator and that is designed to deliver a dose of radiation at a rate exceeding 1 cGy/min at a distance of 1 m;
  3. a radioactive source teletherapy machine;
  4. a particle accelerator that is capable of producing nuclear energy and has a beam energy of less than 50 MeV for beams of particles with a mass equal to or less than 4 atomic mass units;
  5. a particle accelerator that is capable of producing nuclear energy and has a beam energy of no more than 15 MeV per atomic mass for beams of particles with a mass greater than 4 atomic mass units; or
  6. a brachytherapy remote afterloader.

(Source: Class II Nuclear Facilities and Prescribed Equipment Regulations)

Note: The abbreviation cGy/min means centigray per minute. MeV means megaelectron volts.

Class II prescribed equipment certificate (homologation d’équipement réglementé de catégorie II)

A document issued by the Commission or by a designed officer authorized under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, indicating that a model of Class II prescribed equipment is certified for use.

clean waste rock (stériles propres)

Rock without the potential to release hazardous and/or nuclear substances that could have a significant adverse effect on human health or harm the environment. Clean rock may still require management for other reasons, such as to control erosion to prevent deposits of sand in local surface water bodies.

clearance level (niveau de libération)

With respect to radioactivity levels, the maximum permissible concentrations of radioactivity in or on materials, equipment and sites to be released from regulatory control (for example, becquerels per gram or per square centimetre, near-contact dose rates). Clearance levels may be expressed as conditional or unconditional, depending on whether the specific pathways of release, or destinations for reuse, recycling and/or disposal are specified.

cliff-edge effect (effet de falaise)

A small change of conditions that may lead to a catastrophic increase in the severity of consequences. Note: Cliff-edge effects can be caused by changes in any of the following: environment characteristics, the event or the facility response.

CM (gestion de la configuration)

See configuration management or corrective maintenance.

CMD (CMD)

See Commission member document.

CNS (CSN)

Convention on Nuclear Safety

CNSC (CCSN)

See Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

CNSC nuclear criticality safety requirements (exigences de sûreté‑criticité nucléaire de la CCSN)

Regulatory requirements and derived acceptance criteria that are related to nuclear criticality safety and listed in operating licence conditions or other legally enforceable documents.

code 10 (code 10)

Chapter 10 of the subsidiary arrangements of the Canada/IAEA Safeguards Agreement.

code accuracy (exactitude des programmes)

The degree of closeness of a calculated quantity to its actual value. Code accuracy comprises the bias and variability of bias of a computer code that are derived from the comparison of code predictions with experimental data.

collimator (collimateur)

See beam limiter.

Commission (Commission)

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission established by section 8. (Source: Nuclear Safety and Control Act)

Note 1: The Commission consists of not more than seven members, appointed by the Governor in Council, to:

  • make independent, fair and transparent decisions on the licensing of nuclear-related activities
  • establish legally binding regulations
  • set regulatory policy direction on health, safety, security and environmental issues affecting the Canadian nuclear sector

Note 2: This term is not used when the intention is to refer to both Commission members and CNSC staff. See also Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

Commission member document (CMD) (document à l’intention des commissaires [CMD])

A document prepared for Commission hearings and meetings by CNSC staff, proponents and intervenors.

Commission Tribunal (tribunal de la Commission)

A term previously used to refer to the Commission. See Commission.

commissioning (mise en service)

With respect to a reactor facility, a process intended to demonstrate that installed structures, systems and components (SSCs) perform in accordance with their specifications before the facility is placed in service or before the SSCs are returned or placed in service.

commissioning documentation (documentation sur la mise en service)

The plans, instructions, procedures, drawings, reviews, records, reports and the like, which together describe the commissioning of one or more structures, systems or components, or of the integrated reactor facility.

commissioning report (rapport de mise en service)

A report written on completion of commissioning activities to record results, assess compliance with the acceptance criteria, and record actions taken to rectify any deficiencies.

commissioning test (essai de mise en service)

Pre-service testing to demonstrate that structures, systems and components perform within their design specifications.

committed (engagée)

In respect of a dose of radiation, received by an organ or tissue from a nuclear substance during the 50 years after the substance is taken into the body of a person 18 years old or older or during the period beginning at intake and ending at age 70, after it is taken into the body of a person less than 18 years old. (Sources: Radiation Protection Regulations; Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

common cause (cause commune)

See common-cause failure.

common-cause event (événement de cause commune)

An event that leads to common-cause failures.

common-cause failure (CCF) (défaillance de cause commune [DCC])

A failure of two or more structures, systems, or components due to a single specific event or cause, such as a natural phenomenon (earthquake, tornado, flood, etc.), design deficiency, manufacturing flaw, operation and maintenance error, human-induced destructive event, or aging effect.

complementary design feature (caractéristique de conception complémentaire)

A design feature added to the design as a standalone structure, system or component (SSC) or added capability to an existing SSC to cope with design extension conditions. Also called additional safety feature.

complementary indicator (indicateur complémentaire)

A performance or safety indicator that is not specified by legislation or regulation and is not a direct measure of performance or safety (safety indicators), but is used to complement the use of these more direct indicators. Note: Complementary indicators are often intermediate parameters from which performance or safety indicators can be derived, but are easier to calculate and monitor (for example, concentration of contaminant releases as a complementary indicator to human exposure to that contaminant). Complementary indicators can be useful in scoping calculations.

compliance (conformité)

Conformity by regulated persons or organizations with the requirements of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), the regulations made under the NSCA, and licences, decisions, certificates and orders made by the CNSC.

compliance assessment (évaluation de la conformité)

Verification activities mostly limited to the review of licensees’ documents and reports. Some examples are quarterly technical reports, annual compliance reports, special reports and documentation related to design, safety analysis, programs and procedures.

concentrate (concentré)

An extracted product that contains uranium and that results from the physical or chemical separation of uranium from ore. (Source: Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations)

Note: See also uranium concentrate.

conditional clearance level (niveau de libération conditionnelle)

An activity concentration that does not result in an effective dose

  • greater than 1 mSv in a year due to a low probability event referred to in the IAEA Safety Standard RS‑G‑1.7 [2]; or
  • greater than 10 µSv in a year.

(Source:Nuclear Substances and Radiation Devices Regulations)

Note: The abbreviation µSv means microsievert.

condition assessment (évaluation de l’état)

An assessment performed to determine the current performance and condition of a structure, system or component (SSC) (including any age‑related failures or indications of significant material degradation), and to predict the future performance, extent and rate of aging degradation, and residual service life of the SSC.

condition-based maintenance (entretien basé sur l’état constaté)

Maintenance that is planned and performed after identification or diagnosis of a structure, system or component degradation, but before failure occurs. See also predictive maintenance.

condition-based servicing (entretien basé sur l'état constaté)

See condition-based maintenance.

condition indicator (indicateur de l’état)

A characteristic of a structure, system or component (SSC) that can be observed, measured or trended to infer or directly indicate the SSC’s current and future ability to function within acceptance criteria.

condition monitoring (surveillance de l’état)

Continuous or periodic inspections, measurements or trending of the performance or physical characteristics of structures, systems and components, to indicate current or future performance and the potential for failure.

configuration management (CM) (gestion de la configuration)

The process of identifying and documenting the characteristics of a facility’s structures, systems and components (including computer systems and software), and of ensuring that changes to these characteristics are properly developed, assessed, approved, issued, implemented, verified, recorded and incorporated in the facility documentation.

confinement boundary (enceinte de confinement)

A continuous boundary without openings or penetrations, which prevents the release of radioactive materials out of the enclosed space.

Note 1: For small or research reactors, confinement, or confinement boundary, is the equivalent of a power reactor containment boundary but does not have significant pressure-retaining capability.

Note 2: For packaging and transport of nuclear substances, confinement means preserving criticality safety, and containment means containing radioactive material.

confinement system (système d’isolement)

The assembly of fissile material and packaging components intended to preserve criticality safety. (Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

Note: For reactor facilities, see confinement boundary.

conservatism (prudence)

The use of assumptions that make predictions regarding consequences more severe than if best‑estimate assumptions had been used.

conservative calculations (calculs conservateurs)

Calculations that are designed to over-predict a parameter with the intention that the reality will not be greater than the prediction. These calculations can be based on simplifications of the processes being simulated (the structure of a model) or on limits of data values used in the model.

conservative method (méthode prudente)

A method deliberately leading to results that are intended to be limiting relative to specified acceptance criteria.

consignee (destinataire)

Has the same meaning as in the IAEA Regulations. (Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

Note: In the IAEA Regulations, consignee means any person, organization or government that is entitled to take delivery of a consignment.

consignment (envoi)

Has the same meaning as in the IAEA Regulations. (Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

consignor (expéditeur)

Has the same meaning as in section 1.4 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations. (Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

containment (confinement)

A method or physical structure designed to prevent or control the release of nuclear or hazardous substances. Some examples are:

  • for waste management: a barrier system that controls releases to the environment through different chemical and physical applications
  • for reactor facilities: see containment structure

OR

With respect to safeguards, means the structural features of a facility, containers or equipment that are used to establish the physical integrity of an area or items (including safeguards equipment or data) and to maintain the continuity of knowledge of the area or items through the prevention of undetected access to, or movement of, nuclear or other material, or interference with the items.

OR

The exercise of force that is sufficient to isolate, contain and/or stop an adversary in order to prevent the theft of nuclear material or sabotage to a vital area until the offsite response force can make an effective intervention.

containment envelope(enceinte de confinement)

Structures and components that provide a pressure-retaining barrier to prevent or limit the escape of any radioactive matter that could be released from a nuclear reactor.

containment structure (structure de confinement)

For reactor facilities, a physical structure designed to prevent uncontrolled release and dispersion of nuclear substances.

containment system (enveloppe de confinement)

Has the same meaning as in the IAEA Regulations. (Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

OR

See containment structure.

contaminant of potential concern (COPC) (contaminant potentiellement préoccupant [CPP])

Contaminant that could be released to the environment as a result of a project and that may change one or more of the environmental components (atmospheric, aquatic, terrestrial).

contamination (contamination)

Has the same meaning as in the IAEA Regulations. (Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

Note: More generally, contamination refers to nuclear or hazardous substances on surfaces, or within solids, liquids or gases (including the human body), where their presence is unintended or undesirable, or to the process giving rise to their presence in such places.

contamination meter (contaminamètre)

A radiation detection instrument designed to measure surface contamination; this meter is not designed to measure radiation dose or dose rate.

continuing training (formation continue)

A structured curriculum that maintains and enhances knowledge, skills and safety-related attributes, and that addresses areas such as equipment changes and procedure changes, skill weaknesses, infrequently used and difficult-to-acquire knowledge and skills, and lessons learned from operating experiences. Refresher training, requalification training and update training are also considered continuing training.

contractor (sous‑traitant)

See vendor/contractor.

control (contrôle)

See environmental control.

control adapter (adaptateur de commande)

For exposure devices, a component of a control assembly that attaches the control assembly to the exposure container.

control assembly (assemblage de commande)

See remote control.

control cable connector (raccord du câble de commande)

For exposure devices, a component used to attach a drive cable to a source assembly.

control cable (drive cable) (câble de commande)

For exposure devices, a cable or other mechanical means used to push out or retract a sealed source assembly in an exposure container by remote control.

control cable sheath (gaine du câble de commande)

For exposure devices, a rigid or flexible tube for guiding a control cable by remote control to an exposure container and for providing physical protection to the control cable.

controlled area (zone contrôlée)

See restricted area.

controlled nuclear equipment (équipement nucléaire contrôlé)

The controlled nuclear equipment and the parts and components for controlled nuclear equipment referred to in the schedule. (Source: Nuclear Non‑proliferation Import and Export Control Regulations)

See also nuclear and nuclear-related dual-use items.

controlled nuclear information (renseignement nucléaire contrôlé)

The controlled nuclear information referred to in the schedule. (Source: Nuclear Non‑proliferation Import and Export Control Regulations)

See also nuclear and nuclear-related dual-use items.

controlled nuclear substance (substance nucléaire contrôlée)

A controlled nuclear substance referred to in the schedule. (Source: Nuclear Non‑proliferation Import and Export Control Regulations)

See also nuclear and nuclear-related dual-use items.

controlled parameter (paramètre contrôlé)

A parameter that is kept within specified limits, and, when varied, influences the margin of subcriticality.

controller (contrôleur)

A person who, during an emergency drill or exercise, provides data and messages to the emergency responders, for example, to ensure that the sequence of events is unfolding as per the scenario.

control mechanism (mécanisme de commande)

See remote control.

control Raschig rings (controlled sample) (anneaux Raschig de contrôle [échantillon contrôlé])

Raschig rings that are periodically removed from service for scheduled measurements and then returned to service after these short test periods.

control room operator (CRO) (opérateur de salle de commande [OSC])

See reactor operator.

control room shift supervisor (chef de quart de salle de commande)

The person in a multi-unit nuclear power plant who is responsible to the plant shift supervisor for ensuring that the main control room staff function safely within his or her authority limits and that the conduct of operations within the main control room is performed in accordance with the plant’s licence, policies and procedures.

conventional health and safety SCA (santé et sécurité classiques [DSR])

A safety and control area (SCA) that covers the implementation of a program to manage workplace safety hazards and to protect workers. This SCA is one of the 14 within the CNSC SCA Framework.

conventionally true value (valeur conventionnellement vraie)

The value attributed to a particular quantity and accepted, sometimes by convention, as having an uncertainty appropriate for a given purpose. For example, the conventionally true value of Hp(d) is established by measuring the free-in-air kerma (or exposure) in a well-defined field with a calibrated instrument and then applying a conversion coefficient to the result. Sometimes also called best estimate; conventional value; reference value.

conventional value (valeur conventionnelle)

See conventionally true value.

conversion training (formation de conversion)

With respect to fitness for duty, additional training required for a breath alcohol technician who was previously qualified to operate an approved instrument, in order to qualify the technician to operate a different approved instrument. See also approved instrument; breath alcohol technician.

conveyance (moyen de transport)

Has the same meaning as in the IAEA Regulations. (Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

COPC (CPP)

See contaminant of potential concern.

core control processes (processus de contrôle de base)

A functional area that groups 8 of the 14 safety and control areas (SCAs) within the CNSC SCA Framework: radiation protection, conventional health and safety, environmental protection, emergency management and fire protection, waste management, security, safeguards and non‑proliferation, and packaging and transport. Other functional areas are “management” and “facility and equipment”.

core damage (dommage au cœur)

Accident leading to significant fuel damage. For CANDU reactors, core damage is defined as extensive physical damage of the multiple fuel channels due to overheating leading to loss of core structural integrity.

core damage frequency (fréquence des dommages au cœur)

An expression of the likelihood that an accident could cause core damage.

corium (corium)

A lava‑like molten mixture of portions of nuclear reactor core.

corrective action (mesure corrective)

Measure taken to eliminate the cause of a detected nonconformity or other undesirable situation to prevent recurrence. See also adaptive management.

corrective maintenance (CM) (entretien correctif)

Actions that, by means of repair, overhaul or replacement, restore the capability of a failed structure, system or component to perform its defined function within the given acceptance criteria.

counterfeit item (article contrefait)

An item that is intentionally manufactured or altered to imitate a product without the manufacturer or modifier having the legal right to do so.

country of obligation (pays émetteur d’obligations)

The country with which Canada has agreed to accept conditions on the use of the nuclear material received from that country. Note: The country of obligation is not necessarily the country of origin or of supply. The countries of obligation, origin and supply may all be different. For a given quantity of nuclear material, there may be a single country of obligation, multiple countries of obligation, or no foreign obligation. Material that has no specified obligations is referred to as unobligated.

country of origin (pays d’origine)

The country where specified nuclear material was mined.

country of supply (pays du fournisseur)

The country from which specified nuclear material was shipped prior to entering Canada.

cranking mechanism (mécanisme à manivelle)

See remote control.

crawler control (commande de chenille [crawler])

The use of sealed sources to remotely direct the movement of an industrial radiography pipeline crawler unit.

CRDM (mécanisme d’entraînement de la barre de commande)

control rod drive mechanism

credible abnormal conditions (conditions anormales crédibles)

Accidents or accident sequences that have a frequency of occurrence equal to or more than one in a million years. This definition applies specifically to nuclear criticality safety.

crediting (validation)

For a safety analysis, assuming the correct operation of a structure, system or component, or correct operator action.

criminal records name check (CRNC) (vérification nominale du casier judiciaire (VNCJ)

A search used to determine if a person has a criminal record. The search can be based on name and date of birth or, for much greater assurance, on fingerprints for positive identification.

critical component (composant critique)

For exposure devices, a component that is essential to the safe operation of the device, in order to prevent a misconnect or disconnect.

critical group (groupe critique)

A uniform or reasonably homogeneous group of people whose characteristics (such as habits, location or age) cause them to be representative of the more highly exposed individuals, receiving the highest effective dose or equivalent dose (as applicable) than other groups in the exposed population.

criticality (criticité nucléaire)

See nuclear criticality.

criticality accident (accident de criticité)

The release of energy as a result of accidental production of a self-sustaining or divergent neutron chain reaction.

criticality safety control (CSC) (contrôle de sûreté‑criticité [CSC])

See nuclear criticality safety control.

criticality safety index (CSI) (indice de sûreté‑criticité [CSI ou ISC])

Has the same meaning as in the IAEA Regulations. (Source: Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, 2015)

criticality safety staff (personnel de sûreté‑criticité)

See nuclear criticality safety staff.

CRNC (VNCJ)

See criminal records name check.

CRO (OSC)

control room operator; see reactor operator

CSA (CSA)

See CSA Group.

CSA Group (Groupe CSA)

A standard-setting body that works with the regulator, industry and stakeholders to produce consensus-based Canadian industry standards that may be used by the regulator or industry. Formerly called Canadian Standards Association.

CSC (CSC)

See nuclear criticality safety control.

CSDV (SEVC)

condenser steam discharge valve

CSI (CSI)

See criticality safety index.

curie (curie)

See becquerel.

CVC (CVC)

compliance verification criteria

cyber security (cybersécurité)

Protection of digital computer-based systems or components throughout the system’s lifecycle from threats and malicious actions, or from inadvertent actions that result in unintended consequences. Cyber security includes protection from unauthorized, unintended and unsafe modifications to the system, and from unauthorized disclosure and retention of information, software or data associated with the system that could be used to perform malicious or misguided acts that could affect the functionality and performance of the system.

cyclotron (cyclotron)

A particle accelerator that speeds up particles in a circular motion until they hit a target at the perimeter of the cyclotron. Some cyclotrons are used to produce medical isotopes.

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